Bitcoin Back Above $11,000, in 'Strong Negative ...

Exchange rate from Argentine peso to bitcoin, and then bitcoin to US dollar. Is it worth it?

Hi I'm a English teacher from the US living in Argentina. I don't have a local ID yet, so I can't sign up for a bank account or use the paypal equivalent here called Mercado Pago (Paypal only works in argentina for international transfers, not within the country like in the US). I only do online classes and some students are outside of my city.
My question is: if working as a tutor here, is it worth to have my students pay me in bitcoin (which I'm assuming they would have to buy if they don't have already), and then use that to transfer to dollars in my US bank account. Is this worth it or am I losing value in the process?
Edit: Transferwise doesn't work sending money between people in Argentina I can send money from a US bank account to someone in Argentina, but not the other way around. If you don't know the answer to the question I'm asking, please don't respond.
submitted by ThisSuckerIsNuclear to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How does the value of Bitcoin change if I buy 100 US dollars worth right now?

I believe I’m going to start investing in crypto, and Bitcoin seems the most accessible. Let’s say the value of BTC goes up 15% in a week. Does that mean that if I cash in at that point, I would receive 115 US dollars? If I invested 300 dollars and it went up 3% would I receive 309 US dollars? Thanks in advance.
submitted by USERCAST21 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How does the value of Bitcoin change if I buy 100 US dollars worth right now? (x-post from /r/Bitcoin)

submitted by ASICmachine to CryptoCurrencyClassic [link] [comments]

After this halving roughly 8 million dollars US worth of bitcoin isn’t getting mined every single day 🚀🚀

submitted by froureal to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

On this Christmas, remember that Bitcoin wasn’t worth a penny when Satoshi invented it. The Bitcoin Ethos predates and transcends its US Dollar valuation. Bitcoin wasn’t invented because it was valuable relative to USD. It was invented because Satoshi thought it could be a useful tool for humanity.

The price of Bitcoin truly does not matter. All that matters is that people keep fighting for and defending the ethos of sound money in the face of tyrannical global government.
If we stay strong, keep fighting, and defend freedom, then superficial (and subjective) metrics like fiat prices will take care of themselves.
submitted by the420chronicler to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

03-17 01:14 - '1 US Dollar worth of German Paper Money during a period of hyperinflation, 1923.' (i.redd.it) by /u/martinkarolev removed from /r/Bitcoin within 731-741min

1 US Dollar worth of German Paper Money during a period of hyperinflation, 1923.
Go1dfish undelete link
unreddit undelete link
Author: martinkarolev
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

It’s 2028 and 1 Bitcoin is worth 1 million US dollars. If a luxury home was worth 1 million US dollars back in 2019, what would you estimate that this same luxury home is worth in USD and in BTC now? Does hyperbitcoinization require hyperinflation of government currencies and real estate?

It’s 2028 and 1 Bitcoin is worth 1 million US dollars. If a luxury home was worth 1 million US dollars back in 2019, what would you estimate that this same luxury home is worth in USD and in BTC now? Does hyperbitcoinization require hyperinflation of government currencies and real estate? submitted by Sandiegosurf1 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The End of Fractional Reserve Banking - Why $1 worth of bitcoin is worth more than $1 in US dollars, because holding bitcoin is holding title whereas a dollar is a promise, a promise that may not be kept

submitted by Anenome5 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Pennsylvania Senate Democrats paid $700,000 to recover from ransomware attack - The ransom demand was worth nearly $30,000, based on the Bitcoin-to-US dollar exchange rate at the time, but officials declined to pay

Pennsylvania Senate Democrats paid $700,000 to recover from ransomware attack - The ransom demand was worth nearly $30,000, based on the Bitcoin-to-US dollar exchange rate at the time, but officials declined to pay submitted by magenta_placenta to Pennsylvania [link] [comments]

If you think that we will never see a $1M Bitcoin (or leading cryptocurrency), consider that the stock market may be worth QUADRILLIONS of dollars by the time most of us retire.

No one is saying that we will see a $1 million dollar Bitcoin(1) this year, but I think this sub is unusually affected by shortsightedness. A $1 million dollar Bitcoin would put Bitcoin's market cap at $21 trillion. That would be worth about 20% of today's total stock market. I agree that is a lot, and more than it deserves at its current level of adoption. But the stock market is growing by about 10% per year on average, so that means in 10 years it could be worth $250 trillion, in 20 years $700 trillion, in 30 years $1.7 quadrillion. That is a mind boggling number, but history tells us that is what we should expect. A $1M Bitcoin would be worth 1% of that.
(1)I'm using Bitcoin simply because it is the leader right now. It could be any well designed cryptocurrency.
Crypto is growing much faster because there are fewer barriers to entry than there ever were for traditional investing, and the infrastructure is only getting better and more user friendly. The crypto space already has several asset backed tokens for gold or small businesses in development, and it is almost certain that more mature developments will take place in the coming months and years. The primary cryptocurrencies will be closely tied to the funding of all these asset backed tokens. A blockchain based trust system of transferring funds is every bit as valid as a banking system, if not more so as many of us believe, so there is no reason why more companies will not move to the simplicity of using tokens as investment vehicles instead of the bureaucratic process of "going public". When this matures to a high number of profitable companies actually sharing profits, the crypto space and its currencies deserve to be worth 20% of the global stock market, and certainly at least 1%.
submitted by brokemac to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Bitcoin a pump and dump scheme? "Researchers found that a single actor was “likely” behind several accounts that bought millions of dollars worth of bitcoin and drove the exchange rate in the US from $150 to $1,000 over the course of two months."

Bitcoin a pump and dump scheme? submitted by zenmasterzen3 to conspiracy [link] [comments]

Who is to blame for MtGox collapsing and losing half a billion dollars worth of people's Bitcoins? That's right, US regulators.

Basically: Gox or any other exchange was unable to get regulatory approval in the US. Therefore they had to operate elsewhere, causing Americans to send their money overseas to a shady operation in a less regulated jurisdiction which subsequently collapsed. Therefore, "the regulators actions directly cost people $100 million" and "some blame rests firmly on the shoulders of Ben Lawsky and others who made it so people had no choice but to go to Japan to buy the product and service they wanted." The solution? Less regulation.
Full thread which is an all out war between the statists and the libertarians.
While the actual post is at +157 he is quickly called out in the thread by other commenters and downvoted:
this is the biggest crock of shit and i'm sick of seeing it brought up. nobody was forced to do anything.
What the actual fuck? You win a fucking golden medal in olympic-level mental gymnastics. Jesus titty-fucking Christ.
You have got to be kidding here. You're trying to blame regulators because people lost money in an unregulated exchange? Ho-ly shit.
submitted by blorg to SubredditDrama [link] [comments]

With regards to taxation, if I buy 1000 US dollars worth of bitcoin and hold it for the whole year. Do I have to pay taxes on it come tax season eventhough its been idle in my cryptowallet? Or do I only pay taxes if sold? Thanks!

submitted by mysundaydriver to tax [link] [comments]

What's Driving the Bitcoin Revolution: Why $100 worth of Bitcoin is worth more than 100 US Dollars

Those skeptical of bitcoin have a tendency to view it as analogous to certain historical currency manias. Just about every commodity you can think of has been used as money at some point, famously including the giant stone money of Yap island, and Dutch tulipomania.
Tulipomania created economic-history's most famous case of a speculative bubble that went sour. Many, including my own brother, continue to paint bitcoin with the tulip-moniker. A speculative bubble occurs when an asset's price deviates from its intrinsic value.
But because bitcoin is not a stock or a company, people seem to have trouble realizing why bitcoin should have any value at all, and that's what I want to focus on.
The stunning fact is that $100 worth of bitcoin (0.699 BTC as of this writing) is worth more than $100 in any other fiat currency in the world. One way we know this is that people continue to pay fees between 1% - 4% to purchase bitcoin with fiat currencies. Thus, people would rather have $96 - $99 worth of bitcoin than $100 of fiat currency.
The underlying reasons for this are bitcoin's killer features:
This is the economic case for bitcoin, that because bitcoin transactions are irreversible and can be conducted at the cost of pennies, or even for free (if time is no object), regardless of the value being transferred, the result is that retailers find bitcoin extremely attractive--they can improve their profits by nearly the same percentage that they no longer pay Visa/MC/PayPal for payment processing and transaction insurance.
I recently had someone argue that they didn't consider this a killer feature because they believed that Visa could simply lower their transaction fees to remain competitive. This person simply didn't get it. When Visa charges you ~$200 on a $10,000 transaction and a typical bitcoin transaction for the same amount costs $0.13 cents, there's not much room for Visa to lower fees and remain profitable, unless they want to fire 99% of their workforce, sell off every single one of their commercial properties, and abandon fraud protection and a hundred other things they do to remain profitable. Bitcoin defeats the credit card companies on a structural basis which constitutes a classic case of market disruption for which the companies being disrupted have no effective defense.
Because of bitcoin's lower transaction costs, both buyer and retailer should receive and offer better deals of existing goods. At first, retailers will keep prices the same in dollar terms, just price them in bitcoin, and enjoy a significant profit advantage, which their competitors will have to replicate to compete, creating a virtuous cycle of bitcoin adoption among retailers.
But, as retailers in general complete this adoption cycle and begin competing on a bitcoin-basis, they will lower their prices in bitcoin to reflect the lower transaction costs and consumers will begin to benefit directly.
The value of bitcoin to humanity is directly tied to this feature of lower transaction costs which improves the marginal profitability of every single transaction it's used in, meaning in the end lower prices for consumers and raising everyone's standard of living.
That's why bitcoin deserves a market cap of many trillions of dollars, because it has inherent financial advantages in its use, and everyone in the world could profit by using it, making everyone's lives better.
We live in an age where governments believe they have a right to take whatever amount of wages from you that they decide is fair, and to ban the ownership of drugs and weapons they (foolishly) decide they don't want you to own. Bitcoin offers an easy way to circumvent government payment-snooping and ethical gray-markets like Silk Road.
But even if you, like me, have no interest in gray-market transactions, you can take financial privacy that your bank will not give you. By law banks must inform on you to the government, and chances are your purchases are crawled by government computers every single day.
With bitcoin you can conduct as anonymous a transaction as currently possible, connecting to retailers via the TOR network, keeping wallets no one knows you own, etc., etc. Privacy in the bitcoin ecosystem is a topic worth of study to itself.
What I still remember to this day are the words of certain German anarchs I'd met once whom refused to show their face in public anymore or give out their real name--they believe that privacy needed to be taken by each person, not merely expected of other people to give to them.
Perhaps bitcoin's more controversial feature is the expectation of continual deflation over time. Many don't understand how or why this works or what effect it would have on an economy, and some (Keynesians) even think it would harm an economy. Nothing could be further from the truth.
Bitcoin will grow in value as more people begin to demand it as they learn of it. Some have accused bitcoin therefore of being little more than a speculative tulip-bubble. Frankly I would agree with them if it weren't for the fact of lower transaction costs. But it's also true that even without having the lowest transaction costs, bitcoin would probably still be able to survive as a currency in its own right simply from its deflationary policy.
Even after everyone on earth knows about and even uses bitcoin, it would continue to deflate and gain in price as workers became more productive overall, generating more wealth, demanding more goods, and as the population of the planet grows so too will the value of bitcoin.
This makes it good to hold bitcoin for future purposes, which encourages savings, which means people have bitcoin to invest when a really good opportunity comes around, which is how the modern world was built.
Economies become rich the same way people do: by producing more than they consume (and saving it). All the people who say it's good to get rich by borrowing rather than saving ignore that without the savers there would be no one to borrow from.
We are living in a period of historic value-gain that will not often be repeated, and by the time bitcoin's market cap reaches $100 billion would never occur again, so the people who worry about continual volatility should not worry. When bitcoin becomes the native unit of account, volatility (as measured in other currencies) becomes a non-issue.
Much has been made of bitcoin's vulnerability to hackers and the like. But what of the risk of politicians hyperinflating a currency and destroying its value thereby, such as has happened in so many countries around the world.
Bitcoin was founded with the idea of ending the necessity for 3rd party trust in a currency. There's no bitcoin central bank, no equivalent of Bernanke setting fiscal policy, no government controlling supply of bitcoin or abusing it to pump the market on an election year.
Bitcoin replaces the existential risk of a fiat currency with the existential risk of a hacker, or of trusting the robustness of the bitcoin program.
Of the two scenarios, I think it better to risk facing the hacker, because there are very good steps a person can take to be quite sure that a hacker cannot take their bitcoin, and with the advent of hardware wallets this won't even be a big concern anymore.
And as for the robustness of the bitcoin program itself, trust in that can only build with time and use. I think the price increases starting in January are in part a reflection of growing confidence in bitcoin, that it had passed the first big test, the June '11 crash, that the block reward halving experience had proved that mining would continue despite the halving, and the recent blockchain fork showed how the network responds to an emergency bug. Now all we need is someone to attempt a 51% attack and find themselves almost immediately defeated and the stress test will be complete :P
So when you tell someone about bitcoin, when you tell them about the massive uptake in users and the resulting price increase as a result of growing demand, they will imagine it a bubble, but remember to tell them the fact of lower transaction costs. It is the heart of bitcoin adoption.
People want bitcoin because $100 worth of bitcoin is actually worth at least $135 (if you factor in future expected value increases via deflation and discount it to present value, and existing and expected inflation in fiat currencies, and lower overall transaction costs generally which make things cheaper to buy in bitcoin than in dollars). That figure could vary significantly from person to person depending on how fast they think bitcoin adoption will take place (if they do at all), how much they value personal privacy, etc., but this is why people are going to continue to prefer bitcoin over fiat, and move into it slowly but surely.
If this is not a bubble, then it is the world waking up to the true valuation of bitcoin and slowly realizing that this idea is set to change the world.
We live in a historic epoch, and finance will never be the same again.
submitted by Anenome5 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Director disappears with 35 Million US dollars worth in Bitcoin from Clients

Director disappears with 35 Million US dollars worth in Bitcoin from Clients submitted by Haffelaffe1337 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The US Dollar ($), as of this writing, is worth about 0.00017 Bitcoin. You can't really divide a dollar that far without having some decentralization. ......and Bob's ur uncle

submitted by dirtyqtip to btc [link] [comments]

Director disappears with 35 Million US dollars worth in Bitcoin from Clients

Director disappears with 35 Million US dollars worth in Bitcoin from Clients submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Someone gave me a changetip of 1 US dollars worth of bitcoin a while back... what should I do with it now that changetip is shutting down?

Also I am COMPLETELY new to this avenue of finances. I did a bit of research on my own, and I created a Coinbase account and made the transfer.
The concept is intruiging, but I have very little time to get into this. Is it just worth cashing the bitcoin out to my paypal or should I stick with it?
submitted by tunersharkbitten to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

US federal agents stole hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of Bitcoin ... - The Tico Times

US federal agents stole hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of Bitcoin ... - The Tico Times submitted by asdfqwerasdfqwerasdf to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

At the time of transacting, has there ever been an ethereum transaction worth more in US dollars than this bitcoin transaction?

At the time of transacting, has there ever been an ethereum transaction worth more in US dollars than this bitcoin transaction? submitted by ILIKEWHATUGOT to btc [link] [comments]

If 1 bitcoin is worth $2000+ uS Dollars, how is this possible to make small(er) online purchases?

So if one Bitcoin is worth thousands of US dollars, and I'd like to purchase something with Bitcoin, and that somethin costs only let's say $100, how is it possible to facilitate this transaction with Bitcoin when Bitcoin is worth a lot more?
submitted by JesterOfTheSwamp to CoinBase [link] [comments]

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Bitcoin a pump and dump scheme? "Researchers found that a single actor was “likely” behind several accounts that bought millions of dollars worth of bitcoin and drove the exchange rate in the US from /r/conspiracy

Bitcoin mentioned around Reddit: Bitcoin a pump and dump scheme? submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

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Buying BitCoin for $10-Dollars - YouTube

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