GreenAddress Bitcoin Wallet

ALL of my stored cryptocurrency has been STOLEN from my Ledger Nano S!

Hey everyone... I recently logged into my account in Ledger Live expecting to see a great increase with the price of Bitcoin moving up. Instead of seeing what I expected to be about $13,000.00 worth of Bitcoin, Ethereum, Bitcoin Cash, and Ethereum Classic, I see $0.00 balance on everything! I am absolutely blown away, saddened, and disappointed. I purchased the Nano S over two years ago BECAUSE of security. Now, it seems I have lost literally everything, and there is no phone number to contact this company, only through emails, which they have not responded to. I can clearly see all of the funds from every crypto I was holding were sent out to different addresess which have now all been confirmed on the blockchain. Does anyone here have any ideas at all as to what could have happened, or what I can do here? The only way I know of, that the funds can be accessed, is with the 24 word recovery phrase, and that has been written down on the card, by me 3 years ago, and been kept safely in a burn safe box all this time. So how in the world does something like this happen!? I heard about their data breach, and leaking customers info a couple weeks ago and I am wondering if somehow, someway, that access was gained to my wallet with info that was exposed? Can somebody help me here, or has this happened to anyone else in the last few days? Thanks.

UPDATE:
Okay, after reading through all these comments, and everybody saying I must have entered my passphrase on my computer or phone at some point, you guys are right. I forgot, that 3 years ago, when I purchased the Ledger, I wrote down the recovery phrase, and it's been in the burn safe since. BUT, I also, can't believe I'm saying this, but I did enter it into my phone, and sent it to my own email address, where it has been ever since, I guess thinking if I ever lost the paper with the 24 word phrase, or it was stolen, I would have it there, so I could recover my assets. Well, I guess that means somebody else can recover my assets too. :( This IS MY FAULT, and I take full blame for it. I guess I just never thought, without somebody having access to my e-mail that anyone would ever possibly be able to get access to it. It's just so weird, that it's been 3 years, and the assets were just now stolen. I've had close to that amount in there for a couple years now. Again, I thank you for your help and research, i'm to blame here. $13,000 lesson learned. NEVER INPUT YOUR RECOVERY PHRASE INTO DIGITAL FORMAT. Still wish there was something that could be done, but I know once it's gone, it's gone in crypto. Such a shame now that it looks like Bitcoin is beginning it's bull run.
submitted by James88215 to ledgerwallet [link] [comments]

How to add a Trezor wallet to Bitcoin Core as watch-only

I wanted to use Bitcoin Core to keep an eye on transactions (basically using your own full Bitcoin node to validate, instead of "trusting" Satoshilabs and their webwallet). This doesn't mean there's anything wrong with Satoshilabls' trezor web wallet - it's just a matter of being totally sovereign/independent - if you want that, then using your own Bitcoin Core full node is a must.
Spent some time investigating how to do that, so sharing here in case someone wants it. Feel free to point any ways to do it better.
How-To:
  1. Go to the usual Trezor wallet site, then open the wallet you want to import to Core (don't forget passphrase if needed). Copy the ypub text string.
  2. Convert the ypub to xpub using something like this: https://jlopp.github.io/xpub-converte You can save the page and run it offline/airgapped in something like Tails if you don't trust it. There is no security risk (not a private key) but only privacy risk (with your public keys the site can see all transactions/balances of that wallet)
  3. Put the xpub in a Core RPC importmulti command with this formatting:
    importmulti '[{"range": [0, 1000], "timestamp": "now", "keypool": true, "watchonly": true, "desc": "wpkh([000000f1/84h/0h/0h]your_xpub_goes_here/0/)#7x87wdy3", "internal": false}, {"range": [0, 1000], "timestamp": "now", "keypool": true, "watchonly": true, "desc": "wpkh([000000f1/84h/0h/0h]your_xpub_goes_here/1/)#0jzlnc5f", "internal": true}]'
Then open Bitcoin Core and do these other steps...
  1. In File>Create Wallet, create a wallet with "No Encryption" & "Watch Only" - call it anything you like (TrezorA for example).
  2. Open Window>Console, select the wallet you just created (on the pull-down menu at the top) and then paste the importmulti command where you put your xpub.
  3. Core will complain that the checksum is wrong (the "7x87wdy3" and "wdxy2s2t" parts in my example) replace them with the right ones shown in the message and retry.
  4. You should see the wallet imported with success, but with no transaction history. It is necessary to rescan the chain to index the transactions that wallet made. To save time, you can use the blockheight of the first block where you made a transaction with that trezor, for example: "rescanblockchain 590500".
You can find out the block by putting the hash of your first transfer in a block explorer like https://live.blockcypher.com/, look for "blockheight" If you have no idea which block has your first transaction, you can just rescan the whole chain by typing "rescanblockchain 0" in the console (but Core will take way longer to do it).
That's about it, all transactions made from what wallet should then appear in Core and it will warn every time funds are received or spent. You can be running your own full node and constantly monitoring your wallet, without having to use the Trezor or load Satoshilab's site.
You cannot spend from that wallet in Core, but you can use it to generate receive addresses and send to it (keep in mind that if you generate bech32 addresses in Core, those transfers will not appear at Trezor wallet since it doesn't support it yet :| )
Edit: Forgot change addresses, fixed importmulti example.
submitted by beowulfpt to TREZOR [link] [comments]

Thank you Dogecoin and the Doge community!

I wanted to say thank you to this community and this coin for helping me get into cryptocurrency. I had heard of bitcoin before dogecoin, but hadn't looked into it very much until back when bitcoin passed the $1k mark for the first time back in 2013. I was living with room mates at the time and didn't have a lot of money, but had a halfway decent gaming PC and found out you could mine bitcoin.....but not really (ASIC had already taken over) but dogecoin could be mined with even just a CPU. I spent some time researching it and even then the community was friendly, mostly very hopeful, and very helpful. I mined coins and even bought some back when the dogecoin forum was going strong. It made crypto seem inviting, cool, and possibly a way to go to the moon. I took a small risk, invested $100 and about $40 in electricity and had about 100k doges.
Well life happened, I moved out, had a kid, got married, etc. But I still had that wallet, at some point I forgot the password which I really wanted back during this last rally where doge hit $.01 per doge. This started the long journey of getting the wallet on a new computer I had, syncing it to verify coins are still there (1 day), then looking into how to crack my passphrase, and even considered using a service (which would cost 20k dogecoin).
Eventually I figured it out myself and successfully recovered my password, which turned out to be a lot easier than it looked. I started taking a look at the Dogecoin sub and saw that mostly it was the same type of people who were interested in it originally. Nice people who are just excited to be part of the crypto rage and aren't worried about losing their lifesavings on an, in my opinion still unproven technology (meaning at some point getting mass adoption). This is impressive that the doge community is still welcoming and helpful after over 4 years.
So thank you to this community and Dogecoin. To give back I will be giving away 100 Doge to the first 10 posters here, and I will offer my services to either help people who also forgot their passwords (I'll make a separate post for that)
Again thank you to everyone. Too the moon!
submitted by RevanSal to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Question re sending BTC from Electrum wallet without mnemonic / passphrase

Hi /bitcoin,
Apologies in advance if this is a stupid question. Hopefully it's not and you can help me. A couple of years ago I bought a modest amount of bitcoin and more or less forgot about it. I have an Electrum wallet, but I am fairly certain I have misplaced the mnemonic "seed" passphrase. Basically, I want a more secure long term means of storage. Is it possible for me to send my BTC to another new wallet wallet without this passphrase? Cheers.
submitted by KoolKiller to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

The ultimate back-up plan: Your private key, stored in the block chain, encrypted

[edit: It is the ultimate back-up, but it doesn't mean it is the safest. I'm too tired to figure that out. I'm just explaining how to store a private key in the block chain, in case it is useful or can be made useful.]
I had that idea if someone is interested, though I guess people won't like it. It's a bit wild. We encrypt the key and put it in the block chain with a trick.
I'm not saying everyone should do this, but it could be useful to know it can be done.
If you trust encryption and your password more than back-ups or a third-party, then it could be nice. I'm no encryption expert but it should be strong enough.
"Instead of taking 1.3 quadrillion years, our magical cracking supercomputer would only need 328 trillion years." http://www.kotfu.net/2011/08/what-does-it-take-to-hack-aes/
If it's flawed or gets cracked after a billion years, I decline all responsibility. But you can be sneaky about it. I propose a sneaky trick at the end. It's a bit rough on the edges and crazy but I'll put it out there. If people like it, there are always ways to streamline.
Anyway, you can't memorize the key as you can memorize a password. It's true you can put it on paper; then lose the paper. You can encrypt it and keep it on hard drive, then lose the hard drive. Or on a service, and lose the service. The block chain though, is going to stay around as long as you need the key. So I suggest this whole alternative.
You can still put the information on paper if you want. But now, just your memory is enough. Just the password.
The drawback is the infinitesimal odd of someone finding out and spending a lot of years and resources on brute-forcing. I'm not sure what would be the odds of success. Just make it so decades of computing resource cost more than what's inside.
Now I'll explain how to do it from A to Z, for the few interested.
Plan: 0) Vanity 1) Get the key 2) Encrypt the key 3) Put the key in the block chain 4) Retrieval 5) Conclusion
0) Optional: Vanity I recommend a vanity address (choosing the first part of the address). So if worst comes to worst, you find it from memory in the block chain. And also, it's kinda neato. How-to: first, download VanityGen, direct/wiki. Extract it, then Open a console window at the location with shift-right click in the folder, if you have vista/7/8. Then type "vanitygen 1something" in it. It has to start with 1. If it's too long it'll take a lot of time. Ctrl-C to cancel if it's too long. Faster with GPU: oclvanitygen -D 0:0 1something (maybe broken atm) When you have the key, type "importprivkey mykey" in Help->Debug->Console of bitcoin-qt, to add it. Result of this optional step: A beautiful address which can be retrieved from memory if needed (after it has been seen in the block chain with a transaction)
1) Get the key - Download open source Pywallet: direct/profile - Extract pywallet.py somewhere. Shift-right click in the folder and "open a console window" - In the console, type: pywallet --dumpwallet dump.txt If your wallet is encrypted, then add --passphrase=PASSPHRASE Now you find the key in dump.txt. (note: it reads the wallet at C:\Users\x\Bitcoin) Result of this step: the private key; it looks like 51 characters starting with the number 5. (To delete dump.txt, you can use a software so it can't be recovered from HDD, like Recuva it seems)
2) Encrypt the key - Choose an algorithm. Personally, I pick AES-256. - Download a trustworthy program to encrypt text with the algorithm. Here are two with GUI I found. It's open source but I didn't check it, so it's not 100% safe: http://sourceforge.net/projects/textcrypt/ https://code.google.com/p/immediatecrypt/downloads/list They're both jar files. Maybe you can click them. Personally I have to go in the console; I'm so tired of that coffee cup. "C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre7\bin\java.exe" -jar ImmediateCrypt.jar. It gave me an error though. Not the other. Maybe someone can suggest better. - Choose a good password. It's all about the password (and the software). AES is weak with weak password. And crazy strong with a good password. This is not like websites with protection against brute-force. People can brute-force fully if they find out. I like psycho-pass method which is about a pattern on the keyboard instead of semantics. Side Info: http://www.jmir.org/2012/1/e10/ http://www.jmir.org/2013/8/e161/ Or a passphrase if you want. Here is a nice table with password entropy: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Password_strength#Random_passwords Below 64 bits of entropy, it's too unsafe, it's too weak. We need 128 bits or above, as far as I know. That is 25 random alphanumeric. If you're feeling paranoid, 256 bits. You can check entropy of password roughly here: http://rumkin.com/tools/password/passchk.php Remember it is not like websites. There is no "Forgot password?" button. Memorize it permanently; and maybe write it down in your favorite book just in case, I don't know. Result of this step: the encrypted key. It doesn't matter what it looks like as long as it takes you back to the key when you click "Decrypt". (on a different software, preferably)
3) Put the key in the block chain It works by sending some minimum amount to fake addresses, with data encoded in the addresses. Can't try this part because I don't have bitcoins. :[ Only a wallet! If some liked the guide particularly: 1thxd4KJLhBMcfCYaVKYMA8Atv3Dfx9hb :3 I'll follow the method of this great article: http://www.righto.com/2014/02/ascii-bernanke-wikileaks-photographs.html (the blog is remarkable!) - We're supposed to split the encrypted key in chunks of 20 characters. Then convert from ASCII to hex. Last chunk we fill with extra zeros. I wrote a little javascript to do it all automatically! If you don't like it, find a software, or do it manually. Not tested much but seems to work for my test. I'll say how to know if it worked. Copy that: encrypted='';har=(encrypted.split ('').map(function(c){return c.charCodeAt(0).toString(16); }));ek="";har.forEach(function(c){ek+=c;});while(ek.length%40!=0)ek+='0';iEK=0;ek2='';while(ek.length>0){ek2+=ek.substr(iEK,iEK+40) + "\n";if(ek.length>=40)ek=ek.substr(40,ek.length-40);else ek='';};ek2;
Check eventual comments to know if it's a hack/broken mess.
I don't do much Javascript, or much anything. Paste the whole thing in the javascript console. To open the console: Chrome, Ctrl-Shift-J. Firefox, Ctrl-Shift-K. IE9, F12. Put your encrypted key between the '' right at the beginning, then enter.
This should display rows of 40-characters chunks of the encrypted key in hex format (numbers, and a to f). I have 6 chunks but it depends on encryption. It should give twice as much characters as the input except for last zeros, and follow this conversion table from Char to Hx column. If it doesn't, call the police. Or use some Ascii to Hex service.
Now we take these chunks one by one and use https://blockchain.info/q/hashtoaddress/the_hex_chunk to convert to BTC addresses.
Send spare money to each one (the strict minimum is suspect and it'd get found easily) in the right order (wait for 1 or 2 confirmations each time to be sure).
And we're done! The information is safe and cozy, in the block chain. Not safe from brute-forcing, but safe from ourselves; and that's safer, isn't it?
4) Retrieval
Alright, how do we go back from the addresses to the encrypted key? I can't try it myself, but apparently, according to the article: 1) Get the transaction ID on blockchain.info, by going to the wallet's profile 2) Go to http://blockexplorer.com/rawtx/your_transaction_id 3) There will be something like that: "out":[ { "value":"25.08603421", "scriptPubKey":"OP_DUP OP_HASH160 27a1f12771de5cc3b73941664b2537c15316be43 OP_EQUALVERIFY OP_CHECKSIG" } ]
And you need to translate the "27a1f12771de5cc3b73941664b2537c15316be43" part from hex to Unicode. The result should be the chunk of encrypted key, written in hex again. You put all the parts together in order, remove extra zeros. Then use a program to go back from hex bytes to ASCII. Maybe someone can do it or I'll put the javascript one of these days if people are interested; I don't think they'll be. Usually I'm serious and extensive but you can't imagine how tired I am these days, of everything. Anyway, you put that ASCII in the AES program with your password, you click Decrypt.
Then you have your private key.
If you do this, don't lose other back-ups until you have successfully retrieved the key, to know it works.
5) Conclusion I understand that there's a small chance that someone figures the transactions are data, reassembles the parts, has massive luck and breaks the crazy strong encryption with supercomputers and botnets in less than decades, or aliens hack your bitcoins with quantum computers, ect... But I don't know, that seems very unlikely to me; more unlikely than losing personal back-ups or third-parties being untrustworthy.
More importantly, it gives peace of mind of not having to manage back-up stuff. You can format your hard drive and burn your house down if you want without worrying about losing stuff; well, except the house. And maybe the wife. Or you go to prison 20 years, and it'll still be there. If some of you want to go to prison. I know of one.
Here's a complicated idea for the extra-extra-paranoid: You send just one letter by one letter of the encrypted key, into dozens of fake addresses, to which you send bitcoins you got from an exchange and not from the main wallet, and only you know the correct addresses/order with the data, because of a pattern in the other letters. For example, the 2nd letter of the 1st data part is the 1st letter of your password when it's hashed. The 3rd letter of the 2nd data part is the 2nd letter of your hashed password. Ect... And it's not true for the other parts. So you know the order, but not someone without the password. It can go like this for many parts, then maybe if you run out of letters you send through a different wallet. All other characters are misleading except the 1st one, or last one, being the key character. And you also send money to other fake wallets which are purely misleading. Even if a flaw in AES was found and it could be broken instantly, an attacker would have to find the correct combination even before the strong encryption brute-forcing, he can't even know if he has the right combination, and that can be a big number of combinations. You can do the math. It's exponential stuff, I think. That's something I just thought of quickly, and I don't know much about any of that. Someone can find better. (Maybe, or maybe not, there's something about the encryption output which makes it so we can find the order back without password, then we'd need some kind of trick to obfuscate the position or nature of key characters but I won't spend any more time on something likely to be wrong/uninteresting).
tl;dr: "It works by sending some minimum amount to fake addresses, with data encoded in the addresses. "
Point is, once we know we can store data in the block chain, there are plenty of ways to make it so we're never locked out from the main address.
Well, if you can remember the password.
I hope this was useful to someone!
Goodbye
submitted by yemethzi to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

BIP39 Passphrase Recovery (Or Hidden Wallet Password, 25th word) For Ledger, Trezor, Keepkey, etc coinbass wallet password reset Forgot My Bitcoin Wallet Password! - YouTube Recovery BTC Wallet How to recover your BTC.com wallet if you forgot the ...

I’d been keeping my bitcoin keys on a web-based wallet, but I wanted to move them to a more secure place. Many online bitcoin services retain their customers’ private bitcoin keys, which means ... I can't remember my passphrase but if I knew what kind of response -I do have my old tower from back then--but hate to dig that out and search if the coins are lost thanks so much tracy Jan 5 '14 at 17:53 What wallet did you originally use? Jonathan Rogiest Jan 5 '14 at 18:49 I cant remember any of it -I think it was about day-2 of them being available, before this whole sub-language developed ... If a passphrase is not present, an empty string "" is used instead. Warning: Forgetting this password will result in the bitcoin wallet and any contained money being lost. Do not overestimate your ability to remember passphrases especially when you may not use it very often. Warning: The seed phrase password should not be confused with the password used to encrypt the wallet file on disk. This ... Without the passphrase you will not be able to access your wallet, as, if enabled, it becomes a necessary component to your seed. This is in contrast with PIN, which is device-specific. Passphrase is wallet-specific. In other words, your PIN protects your device from being used. Your passphrase protects your seed/wallet from being used. If you have encrypted your Bitcoin.org wallet with a passphrase, then only having that passphrase will allow that to be decrypted. If you have a backup of your wallet prior to performing the encryption step, then any coins from that wallet that still have not been spent can be recovered. Otherwise, without that passphase to open the wallet you cant get to the private keys inside the wallet ...

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BIP39 Passphrase Recovery (Or Hidden Wallet Password, 25th word) For Ledger, Trezor, Keepkey, etc

Simple tutorial that explains how to recover your BTC.com wallet if you forgot your password. Do you have an old v2 wallet at BTC.com? Check this recovery pr... This guide is a offers a few examples of ways that you can use BTCRecover to recover a BIP39 passphrase if you have lost it, forgotten it or have mistyped it. (Ledger wallets call this a hidden ... I offer the help, to your forgotten password for BTC Wallet.dat Also I can give you my script, under a condition not to use him in the illegal purposes. Category reset password for coinbase wallet. How to create COINBASE account (Step by Step) Make Money Online Digital Wallet Cryptocurrency - Duration: 4:54. The Zodiac Life 23,358 views This video is for bitcoinwallet.com users and it explains what to do if you forgot your password.

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